Divorced parents in Georgia may need to ask for a child custody modification at some point. Generally speaking, the modification is only granted if it is in the best interest of the child to do so. A court will consider the request if the current arrangement puts the child in danger of being abused or neglected. Requests may be more likely to be granted if the danger is immediate.

If a parent chooses to not abide by a current custody agreement, it may be changed. However, a judge will look at why the pact hasn’t been followed and whether the parents are still communicating with each other. When a parent dies, it will need to be determined if the non-custodial parent should be allowed to assume custody. If that parent is unable to care for the child, another person may be named to be a child’s guardian.

In the event that a parent moves away, the current custody plan may need to be changed. Of course, it may not be necessary if the relocation doesn’t render the current agreement impractical or if the parents can work out a way to alter it on their own. Regardless of why an agreement may not work anymore, parents are urged to work out a solution on their own before going to court.

If parents are struggling to find a parenting plan that works, it may be possible to settle their differences in mediation. A mediator is a neutral party who will assist in getting the parents to speak with each other. An attorney may review any agreement that is reached before it goes into effect.