Divorced couples in Georgia may experience ups and downs after the marriage ends. The prospect of continuing a relationship for the sake of the kids may burden even the most jovial person.

Co-parenting with an ex is not something that everyone can accomplish. The courts expect you to get along with someone you could not live with when it comes to the children. The professionals at Terri Herron Law understand how co-parenting with someone who does not cooperate may seem impossible. Discover how this process tends to go wrong.

Communication is not open

Parenting children after a divorce may prove difficult, mainly when the two parents cannot communicate with each other. Parents need to have the ability to speak to one another about issues that crop up, such as:

  • Education decisions or changes
  • Medical needs
  • Reimbursement of costs outside child support
  • Activities
  • Emotional or disciplinary problems

If parents cannot agree on how to handle these and other issues, children may sense this and start to exploit the rift. Kids understand when parents get along and when they do not, and as such, talking out what is going on is a critical component to successful co-parenting.

There is no support for the relationship

Divorce may bring out the worst in people. Anger, frustration and sadness often dominate the emotional scene, and if these continue into the post-divorce era, there is a good chance that the children will wind up affected. If one parent does not care for the other, there is less of a chance that the other parent’s relationship with the child will find a strong foundation. In the face of the negativity, children may opt to live with the parent with whom they naturally align.

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