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  4.  » What you should know about Prenuptial Agreements

A Prenuptial agreement is a contract that addresses what to expect should you and your spouse divorce. Several factors may call for divorce in marriage, and most of them are unforeseen from the onset. Therefore, it is healthy to have an agreement early to reduce the chances of conflicts. 

Legally, prenuptial agreements are enforceable, but there are situations that these agreements may be limited. Also, it is worth mentioning that these agreements may affect divorce proceedings if they come about especially when dividing property. Here at Terri Herron Law, we understand what the law states about marriage agreements and, therefore, we can help you determine the validity of your prenuptial agreement. 

According to Forbes, when signing this agreement, a couple should exercise honesty in wealth disclosure. Besides, both sides should have attorneys to oversee the process. When it comes to presenting the contract to a court of law, the attorneys will represent their agreement to the court. 

Also, it is good to bring up the prenuptial agreement idea early in the relationship. To be just enough, you should present it long before the marriage. If you do it hurriedly closer to your planned marriage day, the court may throw it out, citing unpreparedness at the time you signed it. 

Prenuptial agreements often state the terms for alimony. Depending on your agreement, you may either waive alimony or choose not to include it. If there is no mention of alimony in the agreement, then you may follow up on it when divorcing, but if you waived it, neither party should seek it from another. 

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